Transistors: The Field Effect

The field effect transistor is the most common type of transistor.

Download & Launch

Download Size: 70 KB

Add to my backpack

WARNING: Your data will not be saved. To save data, run this activity as a registered user. You can register at the project portal. Please view the requirements below before launching this activity.

Attention

Your data will not be saved. To save data, run this activity as a registered user. You can register at the project portal: Register at the Portal »

Requirements

Transistors are the building blocks of modern electronic devices. Your cell phones, iPods, and computers all depend on them to operate. Thanks to today's microfabrication technology, transistors can be made very tiny and be massively produced. You are probably using billions of them while working with this activity now--as of 2006, a dual-core Intel microprocessor contains 1.7 billion transistors. The field effect transistor is the most common type of transistor. So we will focus on it in this activity.

What exactly does a field effect transistor do? The answer is that it can be used as a switch to control electric current.

Download & Launch

Download Size: 70 KB

WARNING: Your data will not be saved. To save data, run this activity as a registered user. You can register at the project portal. Please view the requirements below before launching this activity.

AAAS Benchmark Alignments (2008)

4. The Physical Setting

4G. Forces of Nature
  • 4G/H4ab*. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that in many conducting materials, such as metals, some of the electrons are not firmly held by the nuclei of the atoms that make up the material. In these materials, applied electric forces can cause the electrons to move through the material, producing an electric current. In insulating materials, such as glass, the electrons are held more firmly, making it nearly impossible to produce an electric current in those materials.
  • 4G/H4d*. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that semiconducting materials differ greatly in how well they conduct electrons, depending on the exact composition of the material.
  • 4G/H8** (BSL). By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that the motion of electrons is far more affected by electrical forces than protons are because electrons are much less massive and are outside of the nucleus.

8. The Designed World

8D. Communication
  • 8D/H1. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that almost any information can be transformed into electrical signals. A weak electrical signal can be used to shape a stronger one, which can control other signals of light, sound, mechanical devices, or radio waves.
  • 8D/H2c. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that digital coding of information (using only 1's and 0's) makes possible more reliable transmission, storing, and processing of information.
8E. Information Processing
  • 8E/H3. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that miniaturization of information processing hardware can increase processing speed and portability, reduce energy use, and lower cost. Miniaturization is made possible through higher-purity materials and more precise fabrication technology.

11. Common Themes

11B. Models
  • 11B/M1*. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that models are often used to think about processes that happen too slowly, too quickly, or on too small a scale to observe directly. They are also used for processes that are too vast, too complex, or too dangerous to study.
  • 11B/M4** (BSL). By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that simulations are often useful in modeling events and processes.
  • 11B/H1a*. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that a mathematical model uses rules and relationships to describe and predict objects and events in the real world.
11D. Scale
  • 11D/M3**. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that natural phenomena often involve sizes, durations, and speeds that are extremely small or extremely large. These phenomena may be difficult to appreciate because they involve magnitudes far outside human experience.

Copyright
© Copyright The Concord Consortium

Record Link
<a href="">The Concord Consortium. Transistors: The Field Effect. Concord: The Concord Consortium, 2010, September 23.</a>

AIP
Transistors: The Field Effect (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2010, September 23), WWW Document, (https://concord.org/).

AJP
Transistors: The Field Effect (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2010, September 23), WWW Document, (https://concord.org/).

APA
Transistors: The Field Effect. (2010, September 23). Retrieved 2016, September 29, from The Concord Consortium: https://concord.org/

Disclaimer: The Concord Consortium offers citation styles as a guide only. We cannot offer interpretations about citations as this is an automated procedure.

Requirements

This activity requires the Java Runtime Environment version 5 (sometimes referred to as 1.5) or later with Java Webstart. You can download it at java.com.

The download for this activity will require 70 KB of disk space.

Related Resources

Comments

Leave a comment

Share on Facebook

Log In

Don't have a profile?

Create a profile and...

Create your profile now »

Loading...