States of Matter

How do the forces and attractions differ between the states of matter?

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Requirements

Take a look at a molecular level at what happens in a substance during the three phases of solid, liquid, and gas. Use interactive computer models to trace an atom’s trajectory at a certain physical stage, and investigate how molecular behavior is responsible for the substance’s state.

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WARNING: Your data will not be saved. To save data, run this activity as a registered user. You can register at the project portal. Please view the requirements below before launching this activity.

AAAS Benchmark Alignments (2008)

4. The Physical Setting

4D. The Structure of Matter
  • 4D/M1a. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that all matter is made up of atoms, which are far too small to see directly through a microscope.
  • 4D/M3cd. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that in solids, the atoms or molecules are closely locked in position and can only vibrate. In liquids, they have higher energy, are more loosely connected, and can slide past one another; some molecules may get enough energy to escape into a gas. In gases, the atoms or molecules have still more energy and are free of one another except during occasional collisions.
  • 4D/M8** (SFAA). By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that most substances can exist as a solid, liquid, or gas depending on temperature.
  • 4D/H7a. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that atoms often join with one another in various combinations in distinct molecules or in repeating three-dimensional crystal patterns.
  • 4D/H7b. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that an enormous variety of biological, chemical, and physical phenomena can be explained by changes in the arrangement and motion of atoms and molecules.
4E. Energy Transformations
  • 4E/M3*. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that thermal energy is transferred through a material by the collisions of atoms within the material. Over time, the thermal energy tends to spread out through a material and from one material to another if they are in contact. Thermal energy can also be transferred by means of currents in air, water, or other fluids. In addition, some thermal energy in all materials is transformed into light energy and radiated into the environment by electromagnetic waves; that light energy can be transformed back into thermal energy when the electromagnetic waves strike another material. As a result, a material tends to cool down unless some other form of energy is converted to thermal energy in the material.

Copyright
© Copyright The Concord Consortium

Record Link
<a href="">The Concord Consortium. States of Matter. Concord: The Concord Consortium, 2010, September 23.</a>

AIP
States of Matter (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2010, September 23), WWW Document, (https://concord.org/).

AJP
States of Matter (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2010, September 23), WWW Document, (https://concord.org/).

APA
States of Matter. (2010, September 23). Retrieved 2016, September 26, from The Concord Consortium: https://concord.org/

Disclaimer: The Concord Consortium offers citation styles as a guide only. We cannot offer interpretations about citations as this is an automated procedure.

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This activity runs entirely in a Web browser. Preferred browsers are: Google Chrome (versions 30 and above), Safari (versions 7 and above), Firefox (version 30 and above), Internet Explorer (version 10 or higher), and Microsoft's Edge.

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