Melting Ice

What is the temperature of ice as it melts?

Launch Activity

Add to my backpack

WARNING: Your data will not be saved. To save data, run this activity as a registered user. You can register at the project portal. Please view the requirements below before launching this activity.

Attention

Your data will not be saved. To save data, run this activity as a registered user. You can register at the project portal: Register at the Portal »

Requirements

Monitor the temperature of a melting ice cube and use temperature probes to electronically plot the data on graphs. Investigate what temperature the ice is as it melts in addition to monitoring the temperature of liquid the ice is submerged in.

Launch Activity

WARNING: Your data will not be saved. To save data, run this activity as a registered user. You can register at the project portal. Please view the requirements below before launching this activity.

AAAS Benchmark Alignments (2008)

1. The Nature of Science

1B. Scientific Inquiry
  • 1B/M1b*. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that scientific investigations usually involve the collection of relevant data, the use of logical reasoning, and the application of imagination in devising hypotheses and explanations to make sense of the collected data.

4. The Physical Setting

4D. The Structure of Matter
  • 4D/M1a. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that all matter is made up of atoms, which are far too small to see directly through a microscope.
  • 4D/M3cd. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that in solids, the atoms or molecules are closely locked in position and can only vibrate. In liquids, they have higher energy, are more loosely connected, and can slide past one another; some molecules may get enough energy to escape into a gas. In gases, the atoms or molecules have still more energy and are free of one another except during occasional collisions.
  • 4D/M8** (SFAA). By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that most substances can exist as a solid, liquid, or gas depending on temperature.
  • 4D/M10** (NSES). By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that a substance has characteristic properties such as density, a boiling point, and solubility, all of which are independent of the amount of the substance and can be used to identify it.
4E. Energy Transformations
  • 4E/M3*. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that thermal energy is transferred through a material by the collisions of atoms within the material. Over time, the thermal energy tends to spread out through a material and from one material to another if they are in contact. Thermal energy can also be transferred by means of currents in air, water, or other fluids. In addition, some thermal energy in all materials is transformed into light energy and radiated into the environment by electromagnetic waves; that light energy can be transformed back into thermal energy when the electromagnetic waves strike another material. As a result, a material tends to cool down unless some other form of energy is converted to thermal energy in the material.
  • 4E/M4*. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that energy appears in different forms and can be transformed within a system. Motion energy is associated with the speed of an object. Thermal energy is associated with the temperature of an object. Gravitational energy is associated with the height of an object above a reference point. Elastic energy is associated with the stretching or compressing of an elastic object. Chemical energy is associated with the composition of a substance. Electrical energy is associated with an electric current in a circuit. Light energy is associated with the frequency of electromagnetic waves.

9. The Mathematical World

9B. Symbolic Relationships
  • 9B/M3*. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that graphs can show a variety of possible relationships between two variables. As one variable increases uniformly, the other may do one of the following: increase or decrease steadily, increase or decrease faster and faster, get closer and closer to some limiting value, reach some intermediate maximum or minimum, alternately increase and decrease, increase or decrease in steps, or do something different from any of these.

11. Common Themes

11B. Models
  • 11B/M1*. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that models are often used to think about processes that happen too slowly, too quickly, or on too small a scale to observe directly. They are also used for processes that are too vast, too complex, or too dangerous to study.
  • 11B/M5**. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that the usefulness of a model depends on how closely its behavior matches key aspects of what is being modeled. The only way to determine the usefulness of a model is to compare its behavior to the behavior of the real-world object, event, or process being modeled.

12. Habits of Mind

12C. Manipulation and Observation
  • 12C/E6** (BSL). By the end of the 5th grade, students should be able to use audio and video recording devices for capturing information.
  • 12C/M3*. By the end of the 8th grade, students should be able to make accurate measurements of length, volume, weight, elapsed time, rates, and temperature by using appropriate devices.

Copyright
© Copyright The Concord Consortium

Record Link
<a href="">The Concord Consortium. Melting Ice. Concord: The Concord Consortium, 2010, September 23.</a>

AIP
Melting Ice (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2010, September 23), WWW Document, (https://concord.org/).

AJP
Melting Ice (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2010, September 23), WWW Document, (https://concord.org/).

APA
Melting Ice. (2010, September 23). Retrieved 2016, September 26, from The Concord Consortium: https://concord.org/

Disclaimer: The Concord Consortium offers citation styles as a guide only. We cannot offer interpretations about citations as this is an automated procedure.

Requirements

This activity runs entirely in a Web browser. Preferred browsers are: Google Chrome (versions 30 and above), Safari (versions 7 and above), Firefox (version 30 and above), Internet Explorer (version 10 or higher), and Microsoft's Edge.

Related Resources

Comments

Leave a comment

Share on Facebook
Grade Level
Middle School
Subject
Chemistry
Focus Area
Modeling and Simulation, Probeware
Rating
0
Rate this resource.

Log In

Don't have a profile?

Create a profile and...

Create your profile now »

Loading...