Hydrogen Bonds: A Special Type of Attraction

Explore the polar molecule interactions known as hydrogen bonds.

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Explore the polar molecule interactions known as hydrogen bonds. Despite the “bond” name, hydrogen bonds are a special type of dipole-dipole interaction. Hydrogen bonds between two molecules (or within portions of a larger molecule) when hydrogen atoms bonded to highly electronegative atoms (such as nitrogen, oxygen, or fluorine) interact with electronegative portions of a different molecule or within the same molecule. Hydrogen bonds are particularly important in stabilizing large macromolecules, such as proteins and DNA.
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Copyright
© Copyright The Concord Consortium

Record Link
<a href="">The Concord Consortium. Hydrogen Bonds: A Special Type of Attraction. Concord: The Concord Consortium, 2013, October 3.</a>

AIP
Hydrogen Bonds: A Special Type of Attraction (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2013, October 3), WWW Document, (https://concord.org/).

AJP
Hydrogen Bonds: A Special Type of Attraction (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2013, October 3), WWW Document, (https://concord.org/).

APA
Hydrogen Bonds: A Special Type of Attraction. (2013, October 3). Retrieved 2017, January 20, from The Concord Consortium: https://concord.org/

Disclaimer: The Concord Consortium offers citation styles as a guide only. We cannot offer interpretations about citations as this is an automated procedure.

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This activity runs entirely in a Web browser. Preferred browsers are: Google Chrome (versions 30 and above), Safari (versions 7 and above), Firefox (version 30 and above), Internet Explorer (version 10 or higher), and Microsoft's Edge.

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Comments

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Love the hydrogen bonds, charges and bond vibrations. I wish there were a simulation of freezing and realistic changing density. Ice should float.

Unfortunately, that is not possible with our 2D modeling environment. The crystalline structure for ice requires a 3D modeling space.

I would like it if the simulation showed how the water molecules form a crystalline structure as they form a solid, ice, and spaced themselves further apart. A simple graph of density vs. temperature would be really useful too.
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