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Making and Breaking Bonds

Explore the association and dissociation of diatomic molecules.

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Requirements

This activity requires the Java Runtime Environment version 5 (sometimes referred to as 1.5) or later with Java Webstart. You can download it at java.com.

Atoms collide and, under certain circumstances, react to form bonds with one another. The process of association is the bonding of atoms into a molecule while dissociation is the process by which a molecule breaks apart into simpler groups of atoms, individual atoms, or ions. Students interact with a molecular dynamics model to explore the making and breaking of bonds.

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WARNING: Your data will not be saved. To save data, run this activity as a registered user. You can register at the project portal. Please view the requirements below before launching this activity.

Subject
Chemistry

Focus Area
Modeling and Simulation

Grade Level
High School

License
LGPL License

AAAS Benchmark Alignments (2008)

4. The Physical Setting

4D. The Structure of Matter
  • 4D/M3ab. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that atoms and molecules are perpetually in motion. Increased temperature means greater average energy of motion, so most substances expand when heated.
  • 4D/H7a. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that atoms often join with one another in various combinations in distinct molecules or in repeating three-dimensional crystal patterns.
  • 4D/H8. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that the configuration of atoms in a molecule determines the molecule's properties. Shapes are particularly important in how large molecules interact with others.
  • 4D/H9a. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that the rate of reactions among atoms and molecules depends on how often they encounter one another, which is affected by the concentration, pressure, and temperature of the reacting materials.

10. Historical Perspectives

10F. Understanding Fire
  • 10F/H5*. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that since Lavoisier and Dalton, the system for describing chemical reactions has been vastly extended to account for the configuration taken by atoms when they bond to one another and to describe the inner workings of atoms that account for why they bond as they do.

11. Common Themes

11B. Models
  • 11B/M1*. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that models are often used to think about processes that happen too slowly, too quickly, or on too small a scale to observe directly. They are also used for processes that are too vast, too complex, or too dangerous to study.
  • 11B/H1a*. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that a mathematical model uses rules and relationships to describe and predict objects and events in the real world.
  • 11B/H4** (SFAA). By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that often, a mathematical model may fit a phenomenon over a small range of conditions (such as temperature or time), but it may not fit well over a wider range.
11C. Constancy and Change
  • 11C/H12** (SFAA). By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that even though a system may appear to be unchanging when viewed macroscopically, there is continual activity of the molecules in the system.
11D. Scale
  • 11D/M3**. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that natural phenomena often involve sizes, durations, and speeds that are extremely small or extremely large. These phenomena may be difficult to appreciate because they involve magnitudes far outside human experience.

Copyright
© Copyright The Concord Consortium

Record Link
<a href="stem-resources/making-and-breaking-bonds">The Concord Consortium. Making and Breaking Bonds. Concord: The Concord Consortium, 2011, May 6.</a>

AIP
Making and Breaking Bonds (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2011, May 6), WWW Document, (http://concord.org/stem-resources/making-and-breaking-bonds).

AJP
Making and Breaking Bonds (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2011, May 6), WWW Document, (http://concord.org/stem-resources/making-and-breaking-bonds).

APA
Making and Breaking Bonds. (2011, May 6). Retrieved 2014, November 20, from The Concord Consortium: http://concord.org/stem-resources/making-and-breaking-bonds

Disclaimer: The Concord Consortium offers citation styles as a guide only. We cannot offer interpretations about citations as this is an automated procedure.

Requirements

This activity requires the Java Runtime Environment version 5 (sometimes referred to as 1.5) or later with Java Webstart. You can download it at java.com.

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Innovative Technology in Science InquiryThis resource is a part of the Concord Consortium's Innovative Technology in Science Inquiry project.

Grade Level
High School
Subject
Chemistry
Focus Area
Modeling and Simulation
Rating
5
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