Activities

Chemical Bonds

Explore the different kinds of chemical bonds that can form, ranging from non-polar covalent to ionic.

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This activity requires the Java Runtime Environment version 5 (sometimes referred to as 1.5) or later with Java Webstart. You can download it at java.com.

Electrons are key to forming the two broad categories of chemical bonds: covalent and ionic. Atoms, which have a nucleus surrounded by electrons, are represented in several different ways. In the Chemical Bonds activity, students explore the different kinds of chemical bonds that can form, ranging from non-polar covalent to ionic. In the model depicted above students adjust the electronegativity of two atoms and see the effect it has on electron distribution and bond type.

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Download Size: 5 MB

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Subject
Chemistry

Focus Area
Modeling and Simulation

Grade Level
High School

License
LGPL License

AAAS Benchmark Alignments (2008)

4. The Physical Setting

4D. The Structure of Matter
  • 4D/H1*. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that atoms are made of a positively charged nucleus surrounded by negatively charged electrons. The nucleus is a tiny fraction of the volume of an atom but makes up almost all of its mass. The nucleus is composed of protons and neutrons which have roughly the same mass but differ in that protons are positively charged while neutrons have no electric charge.
  • 4D/H2*. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that the number of protons in the nucleus determines what an atom's electron configuration can be and so defines the element. An atom's electron configuration, particularly the outermost electrons, determines how the atom can interact with other atoms. Atoms form bonds to other atoms by transferring or sharing electrons.
  • 4D/H7a. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that atoms often join with one another in various combinations in distinct molecules or in repeating three-dimensional crystal patterns.
  • 4D/H9b. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that some atoms and molecules are highly effective in encouraging the interaction of others.
4E. Energy Transformations
  • 4E/H4*. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that chemical energy is associated with the configuration of atoms in molecules that make up a substance. Some changes of configuration require a net input of energy whereas others cause a net release.
4G. Forces of Nature
  • 4G/H2a*. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that electric forces acting within and between atoms are vastly stronger than the gravitational forces acting between the atoms. At larger scales, gravitational forces accumulate to produce a large and noticeable effect, whereas electric forces tend to cancel each other out.

10. Historical Perspectives

10F. Understanding Fire
  • 10F/H3*. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that in the early 1800s, British chemist and physicist John Dalton united the concepts of atoms and elements. He proposed two ideas that laid the groundwork for modern chemistry: first, that elements are formed from small, indivisible particles called atoms, which are identical for a given element but different from any other element; and second, that chemical compounds are formed from atoms by combining a definite number of each type of atom to form one molecule of the compound.
  • 10F/H5*. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that since Lavoisier and Dalton, the system for describing chemical reactions has been vastly extended to account for the configuration taken by atoms when they bond to one another and to describe the inner workings of atoms that account for why they bond as they do.

11. Common Themes

11B. Models
  • 11B/H1a*. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that a mathematical model uses rules and relationships to describe and predict objects and events in the real world.
11D. Scale
  • 11D/M3**. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that natural phenomena often involve sizes, durations, and speeds that are extremely small or extremely large. These phenomena may be difficult to appreciate because they involve magnitudes far outside human experience.

12. Habits of Mind

12D. Communication Skills
  • 12D/M6**. By the end of the 8th grade, students should be able to present a brief scientific explanation orally or in writing that includes a claim and the evidence and reasoning that supports the claim.
  • 12D/H7*. By the end of the 12th grade, students should be able to use tables, charts, and graphs in making arguments and claims in oral, written, and visual presentations.

Copyright
© Copyright The Concord Consortium

Record Link
<a href="stem-resources/chemical-bonds">The Concord Consortium. Chemical Bonds. Concord: The Concord Consortium, 2010, September 21.</a>

AIP
Chemical Bonds (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2010, September 21), WWW Document, (http://concord.org/stem-resources/chemical-bonds).

AJP
Chemical Bonds (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2010, September 21), WWW Document, (http://concord.org/stem-resources/chemical-bonds).

APA
Chemical Bonds. (2010, September 21). Retrieved 2014, September 16, from The Concord Consortium: http://concord.org/stem-resources/chemical-bonds

Disclaimer: The Concord Consortium offers citation styles as a guide only. We cannot offer interpretations about citations as this is an automated procedure.

Requirements

This activity requires the Java Runtime Environment version 5 (sometimes referred to as 1.5) or later with Java Webstart. You can download it at java.com.

The download for this activity will require 5 MB of disk space.

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This resource is a part of the Concord Consortium's RI-ITEST project.

Grade Level
High School
Subject
Chemistry
Focus Area
Modeling and Simulation
Rating
4
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