Activities

Building a Zip Line

Design, build, and study a zip line that is safe and fun to use.

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Requirements

The Java Runtime Environment version 5 (sometimes referred to as 1.5) or later with Java Webstart is required to run any of the activities. You can download it at: java.com.

A zip line is a way to glide from one point to another while hanging from a cable. Design and create a zip line that is safe for a hard-boiled egg. After designing a safety egg harness, connect the harness to fishing line or wire connected between two chairs of different heights using a paper clip. Learn to improve your zip line based on data. Attach a motion sensor at the bottom of your zip line and display a graph to show how smooth a ride your egg had!

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WARNING: Your data will not be saved. To save data, run this activity as a registered user. You can register at the project portal. Please view the requirements below before launching this activity.

Subject
Engineering

Focus Area
Probeware

Grade Level
Elementary School

License
LGPL License

AAAS Benchmark Alignments (2008)

1. The Nature of Science

1C. The Scientific Enterprise
  • 1C/E1. By the end of the 5th grade, students should know that science is an adventure that people everywhere can take part in, as they have for many centuries.
  • 1C/E3. By the end of the 5th grade, students should know that doing science involves many different kinds of work and engages men and women of all ages and backgrounds.

3. The Nature of Technology

3B. Design and Systems
  • 3B/E1*. By the end of the 5th grade, students should know that there is no perfect design. Designs that are best in one respect (safety or ease of use, for example) may be inferior in other ways (cost or appearance). Usually some features must be sacrificed to get others.
3C. Issues in Technology
  • 3C/E4*. By the end of the 5th grade, students should know that factors such as cost, safety, appearance, environmental impact, and what will happen if the solution fails must be considered in technological design.

4. The Physical Setting

4B. The Earth
  • 4B/E1. By the end of the 5th grade, students should know that things on or near the earth are pulled toward it by the earth's gravity.
4F. Motion
  • 4F/E1a. By the end of the 5th grade, students should know that changes in speed or direction of motion are caused by forces.
  • 4F/E1bc. By the end of the 5th grade, students should know that the greater the force is, the greater the change in motion will be. The more massive an object is, the less effect a given force will have.

11. Common Themes

11A. Systems
  • 11A/E1. By the end of the 5th grade, students should know that in something that consists of many parts, the parts usually influence one another.
  • 11A/E2. By the end of the 5th grade, students should know that something may not work well (or at all) if a part of it is missing, broken, worn out, mismatched, or misconnected.
11B. Models
  • 11B/E2*. By the end of the 5th grade, students should know that geometric figures, number sequences, graphs, diagrams, sketches, number lines, maps, and oral and written descriptions can be used to represent objects, events, and processes in the real world.
  • 11B/E3** (SFAA). By the end of the 5th grade, students should know that a model of something is similar to, but not exactly like, the thing being modeled. Some models are physically similar to what they are representing, but others are not.

12. Habits of Mind

12C. Manipulation and Observation
  • 12C/E6** (BSL). By the end of the 5th grade, students should be able to use audio and video recording devices for capturing information.
12D. Communication Skills
  • 12D/E2*. By the end of the 5th grade, students should be able to make sketches or diagrams to aid in explaining procedures or ideas.
  • 12D/E3. By the end of the 5th grade, students should be able to use numerical data in describing and comparing objects and events.
  • 12D/E4** (BSL). By the end of the 5th grade, students should be able to read simple tables and graphs produced by others and describe what the tables and graphs show.
  • 12D/E7**. By the end of the 5th grade, students should be able to write a clear and accurate description of a real-world object or event.

Copyright
© Copyright The Concord Consortium

Record Link
<a href="stem-resources/building-zip-line">The Concord Consortium. Building a Zip Line. Concord: The Concord Consortium, 2012, May 21.</a>

AIP
Building a Zip Line (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2012, May 21), WWW Document, (http://concord.org/stem-resources/building-zip-line).

AJP
Building a Zip Line (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2012, May 21), WWW Document, (http://concord.org/stem-resources/building-zip-line).

APA
Building a Zip Line. (2012, May 21). Retrieved 2014, July 22, from The Concord Consortium: http://concord.org/stem-resources/building-zip-line

Disclaimer: The Concord Consortium offers citation styles as a guide only. We cannot offer interpretations about citations as this is an automated procedure.

Requirements

The Java Runtime Environment version 5 (sometimes referred to as 1.5) or later with Java Webstart is required to run any of the activities. You can download it at: java.com.

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Innovative Technology in Science InquiryThis resource is a part of the Concord Consortium's Innovative Technology in Science Inquiry project.

Grade Level
Elementary School
Subject
Engineering
Focus Area
Probeware
Rating
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