Semiconductors

Explore the structure and behavior of natural and doped semiconductors.

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Requirements

On OS X 10.9 or newer, you will need to install a launcher application to run this Java activity. If you have not already installed it, please:

  • Download the launcher installer
  • Open the downloaded .dmg file and drag the CCLauncher application to your Applications folder
  • Return to this page and launch the resource

Semiconductors are the materials that make modern electronics work. Learn about the basic properties of intrinsic and extrinsic—or doped—semiconductors with several visualizations. Turn a silicon crystal into an insulator or a conductor, create a depletion region between semiconductors, and explore probability waves of an electron in this interactive activity.

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WARNING: Your data will not be saved. To save data, run this activity as a registered user. You can register at the project portal. Please view the requirements below before launching this activity.

AAAS Benchmark Alignments (2008)

3. The Nature of Technology

3A. Technology and Science
  • 3A/H4** (SFAA). By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that engineers use knowledge of science and technology, together with strategies of design, to solve practical problems. Scientific knowledge provides a means of estimating what the behavior of things will be even before they are made. Moreover, science often suggests new kinds of behavior that had not even been imagined before, and so leads to new technologies.

4. The Physical Setting

4D. The Structure of Matter
  • 4D/H9b. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that some atoms and molecules are highly effective in encouraging the interaction of others.
4E. Energy Transformations
  • 4E/H5*. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that when energy of an isolated atom or molecule changes, it does so in a definite jump from one value to another, with no possible values in between. The change in energy occurs when light is absorbed or emitted, so the light also has distinct energy values. The light emitted or absorbed by separate atoms or molecules (as in a gas) can be used to identify what the substance is.
4G. Forces of Nature
  • 4G/H4ab*. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that in many conducting materials, such as metals, some of the electrons are not firmly held by the nuclei of the atoms that make up the material. In these materials, applied electric forces can cause the electrons to move through the material, producing an electric current. In insulating materials, such as glass, the electrons are held more firmly, making it nearly impossible to produce an electric current in those materials.
  • 4G/H4c*. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that at very low temperatures, some materials become superconductors and offer no resistance to the flow of electrons.
  • 4G/H4d*. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that semiconducting materials differ greatly in how well they conduct electrons, depending on the exact composition of the material.
  • 4G/H8** (BSL). By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that the motion of electrons is far more affected by electrical forces than protons are because electrons are much less massive and are outside of the nucleus.

8. The Designed World

8E. Information Processing
  • 8E/H3. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that miniaturization of information processing hardware can increase processing speed and portability, reduce energy use, and lower cost. Miniaturization is made possible through higher-purity materials and more precise fabrication technology.

11. Common Themes

11A. Systems
  • 11A/H2. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that understanding how things work and designing solutions to problems of almost any kind can be facilitated by systems analysis. In defining a system, it is important to specify its boundaries and subsystems, indicate its relation to other systems, and identify what its input and output are expected to be.
11B. Models
  • 11B/M1*. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that models are often used to think about processes that happen too slowly, too quickly, or on too small a scale to observe directly. They are also used for processes that are too vast, too complex, or too dangerous to study.
  • 11B/M4** (BSL). By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that simulations are often useful in modeling events and processes.
  • 11B/H1a*. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that a mathematical model uses rules and relationships to describe and predict objects and events in the real world.

Copyright
© Copyright The Concord Consortium

Record Link
<a href="">The Concord Consortium. Semiconductors. Concord: The Concord Consortium, 2011, September 21.</a>

AIP
Semiconductors (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2011, September 21), WWW Document, (https://concord.org/).

AJP
Semiconductors (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2011, September 21), WWW Document, (https://concord.org/).

APA
Semiconductors. (2011, September 21). Retrieved 2017, June 29, from The Concord Consortium: https://concord.org/

Disclaimer: The Concord Consortium offers citation styles as a guide only. We cannot offer interpretations about citations as this is an automated procedure.

Requirements

This activity requires the Java Runtime Environment version 5 (sometimes referred to as 1.5) or later with Java Webstart. You can download it at java.com.

On OS X 10.9 or newer, you will need to install a launcher application to run this Java activity. If you have not already installed it, please:

  • Download the launcher installer
  • Open the downloaded .dmg file and drag the CCLauncher application to your Applications folder
  • Return to this page and launch the resource

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Electron TechnologiesThis resource is a part of the Concord Consortium's Electron Technologies project.

Grade Level
High School, Higher Education
Subject
Physics
Focus Area
Modeling and Simulation
Rating
0
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