Seeing Motion

Investigate simple, straight-line motion.

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Requirements

Explore your own straight-line motion using a motion sensor to generate distance versus time graphs of your own motion. Learn how changes in speed and direction affect the graph, and gain an understanding of how motion can be represented on a graph.

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Subject
Physics

Focus Area
Modeling and Simulation

Grade Level
Middle School

License
CC BY 4.0

AAAS Benchmark Alignments (2008)

2. The Nature of Mathematics

2A. Patterns and Relationships
  • 2A/E2. By the end of the 5th grade, students should know that mathematical ideas can be represented concretely, graphically, or symbolically.

4. The Physical Setting

4F. Motion
  • 4F/E1a. By the end of the 5th grade, students should know that changes in speed or direction of motion are caused by forces.
  • 4F/E2. By the end of the 5th grade, students should know that how fast things move differs greatly. Some things are so slow that their journey takes a long time; others move too fast for people to even see them.

9. The Mathematical World

9B. Symbolic Relationships
  • 9B/E2. By the end of the 5th grade, students should know that tables and graphs can show how values of one quantity are related to values of another.
  • 9B/M3*. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that graphs can show a variety of possible relationships between two variables. As one variable increases uniformly, the other may do one of the following: increase or decrease steadily, increase or decrease faster and faster, get closer and closer to some limiting value, reach some intermediate maximum or minimum, alternately increase and decrease, increase or decrease in steps, or do something different from any of these.

11. Common Themes

11B. Models
  • 11B/E2*. By the end of the 5th grade, students should know that geometric figures, number sequences, graphs, diagrams, sketches, number lines, maps, and oral and written descriptions can be used to represent objects, events, and processes in the real world.
  • 11B/M2. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that mathematical models can be displayed on a computer and then modified to see what happens.
  • 11B/M5**. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that the usefulness of a model depends on how closely its behavior matches key aspects of what is being modeled. The only way to determine the usefulness of a model is to compare its behavior to the behavior of the real-world object, event, or process being modeled.

Copyright
© Copyright The Concord Consortium

Record Link
<a href="">The Concord Consortium. Seeing Motion. Concord: The Concord Consortium, 2010, September 23.</a>

AIP
Seeing Motion (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2010, September 23), WWW Document, (https://concord.org/).

AJP
Seeing Motion (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2010, September 23), WWW Document, (https://concord.org/).

APA
Seeing Motion. (2010, September 23). Retrieved 2017, April 28, from The Concord Consortium: https://concord.org/

Disclaimer: The Concord Consortium offers citation styles as a guide only. We cannot offer interpretations about citations as this is an automated procedure.

Requirements

This activity runs entirely in a Web browser. Preferred browsers are: Google Chrome (versions 30 and above), Safari (versions 7 and above), Firefox (version 30 and above), Internet Explorer (version 10 or higher), and Microsoft's Edge.

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Innovative Technology in Science InquiryThis resource is a part of the Concord Consortium's Innovative Technology in Science Inquiry project.

Grade Level
Middle School
Subject
Physics
Focus Area
Modeling and Simulation
Rating
0
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