Motion Toward and Away

Explore different ways of describing motion on a graph.

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Requirements

Portions of this activity require a Vernier Go!Motion sensor, an inexpensive device that plugs into your USB port. To use the sensor computers must have Java installed. Otherwise, the activity runs entirely in a Web browser.

Learn to differentiate between graphs of forward and backward motion. Predict what graphs look like before using a motion sensor, and then compare your predictions with real data. Respond to questions about several other position-time graphs and also explore position-time graphs that do not start at the origin (0,0). Motion Toward and Away is the second of five SmartGraphs activities designed for a typical physical science unit of study on the motion of objects. (The other four are: Maria’s Run; How Fast Am I Moving?; Describing Velocity; and, Was Galileo Right?)

» Lesson Plan and Student Assessment documents are also available.

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AAAS Benchmark Alignments (2008)

2. The Nature of Mathematics

2A. Patterns and Relationships
  • 2A/E2. By the end of the 5th grade, students should know that mathematical ideas can be represented concretely, graphically, or symbolically.

4. The Physical Setting

4F. Motion
  • 4F/E2. By the end of the 5th grade, students should know that how fast things move differs greatly. Some things are so slow that their journey takes a long time; others move too fast for people to even see them.

9. The Mathematical World

9B. Symbolic Relationships
  • 9B/E2. By the end of the 5th grade, students should know that tables and graphs can show how values of one quantity are related to values of another.
  • 9B/M2*. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that rates of change can be computed from differences in magnitudes and vice versa.
  • 9B/M3*. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that graphs can show a variety of possible relationships between two variables. As one variable increases uniformly, the other may do one of the following: increase or decrease steadily, increase or decrease faster and faster, get closer and closer to some limiting value, reach some intermediate maximum or minimum, alternately increase and decrease, increase or decrease in steps, or do something different from any of these.

11. Common Themes

11B. Models
  • 11B/M5**. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that the usefulness of a model depends on how closely its behavior matches key aspects of what is being modeled. The only way to determine the usefulness of a model is to compare its behavior to the behavior of the real-world object, event, or process being modeled.
11C. Constancy and Change
  • 11C/E2b. By the end of the 5th grade, students should know that often the best way to tell which kinds of change are happening is to make a table or graph of measurements.

Copyright
© Copyright The Concord Consortium

Record Link
<a href="">The Concord Consortium. Motion Toward and Away. Concord: The Concord Consortium, 2012, January 17.</a>

AIP
Motion Toward and Away (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2012, January 17), WWW Document, (https://concord.org/).

AJP
Motion Toward and Away (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2012, January 17), WWW Document, (https://concord.org/).

APA
Motion Toward and Away. (2012, January 17). Retrieved 2017, April 26, from The Concord Consortium: https://concord.org/

Disclaimer: The Concord Consortium offers citation styles as a guide only. We cannot offer interpretations about citations as this is an automated procedure.

Requirements

This activity runs entirely in a Web browser. Preferred browsers are: Google Chrome (versions 30 and above), Safari (versions 7 and above), Firefox (version 30 and above), Internet Explorer (version 10 or higher), and Microsoft's Edge.

Portions of this activity require a Vernier Go!Motion sensor, an inexpensive device that plugs into your USB port. To use the sensor computers must have Java installed. Otherwise, the activity runs entirely in a Web browser.

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SmartGraphsThis resource is a part of the Concord Consortium's SmartGraphs project.

Grade Level
Middle School
Subject
Mathematics, Physics
Focus Area
Modeling and Simulation, Probeware
Rating
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