Meiosis

Learn how meiosis and fertilization shuffle the alleles that offspring inherit.

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Meiosis is the process by which gametes (eggs and sperm) are made. Gametes have only one set of chromosomes. Therefore, meiosis involves a reduction in the amount of genetic material. Each gamete has only half the chromosomes of the original germ cell. Explore meiosis with a computer model of dragons. Run meiosis, inspect the chromosomes, then choose gametes to fertilize. Predict the results of the dragon offspring and try to make a dragon without legs. Learn why all siblings do not look alike.

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WARNING: Your data will not be saved. To save data, run this activity as a registered user. You can register at the project portal. Please view the requirements below before launching this activity.

Subject
Biology

Focus Area
Modeling and Simulation

Grade Level
Middle School

License
CC BY 4.0

AAAS Benchmark Alignments (2008)

5. The Living Environment

5A. Diversity of Life
  • 5A/H1a. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that the variation of organisms within a species increases the likelihood that at least some members of the species will survive under changed environmental conditions.
  • 5A/H1b. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that a great diversity of species increases the chance that at least some living things will survive in the face of large changes in the environment.
5B. Heredity
  • 5B/M1b*. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that in organisms that have two sexes, typically half of the genes come from each parent.
  • 5B/M2a. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that in sexual reproduction, a single specialized cell from a female merges with a specialized cell from a male.
  • 5B/H1. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that some new gene combinations make little difference, some can produce organisms with new and perhaps enhanced capabilities, and some can be deleterious.
  • 5B/H2. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that the sorting and recombination of genes in sexual reproduction results in a great variety of possible gene combinations in the offspring of any two parents.
5C. Cells
  • 5C/H4c. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that before a cell divides, the instructions are duplicated so that each of the two new cells gets all the necessary information for carrying on.
5F. Evolution of Life
  • 5F/M1. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that small differences between parents and offspring can accumulate (through selective breeding) in successive generations so that descendants are very different from their ancestors.
  • 5F/M5*. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that reproduction is necessary for the survival of any species.
  • 5F/H6b. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that chance alone can result in the persistence of some heritable characteristics having no survival or reproductive advantage or disadvantage for the organism.

11. Common Themes

11B. Models
  • 11B/M1*. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that models are often used to think about processes that happen too slowly, too quickly, or on too small a scale to observe directly. They are also used for processes that are too vast, too complex, or too dangerous to study.
  • 11B/M2. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that mathematical models can be displayed on a computer and then modified to see what happens.
  • 11B/M6** (SFAA). By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that a model can sometimes be used to get ideas about how the thing being modeled actually works, but there is no guarantee that these ideas are correct if they are based on the model alone.

Copyright
© Copyright The Concord Consortium

Record Link
<a href="">The Concord Consortium. Meiosis. Concord: The Concord Consortium, 2010, September 15.</a>

AIP
Meiosis (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2010, September 15), WWW Document, (https://concord.org/).

AJP
Meiosis (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2010, September 15), WWW Document, (https://concord.org/).

APA
Meiosis. (2010, September 15). Retrieved 2017, January 20, from The Concord Consortium: https://concord.org/

Disclaimer: The Concord Consortium offers citation styles as a guide only. We cannot offer interpretations about citations as this is an automated procedure.

Requirements

This activity runs entirely in a Web browser. Preferred browsers are: Google Chrome (versions 30 and above), Safari (versions 7 and above), Firefox (version 30 and above), Internet Explorer (version 10 or higher), and Microsoft's Edge.

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Innovative Technology in Science InquiryThis resource is a part of the Concord Consortium's Innovative Technology in Science Inquiry project.

Grade Level
Middle School
Subject
Biology
Focus Area
Modeling and Simulation
Rating
0
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