Making Waves

Investigate the creation of different wave shapes.

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Requirements

Repeated motion is present everywhere in nature. Learn how to “make waves“ with your own movements using a motion detector to plot your position as a function of time, and try to duplicate wave patterns presented in the activity. Investigate the concept of distance versus time graphs and see how your own movement can be represented on a graph.

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Subject
Physics

Focus Area
Modeling and Simulation

Grade Level
Middle School

License
CC BY 4.0

AAAS Benchmark Alignments (2008)

4. The Physical Setting

4F. Motion
  • 4F/E1bc. By the end of the 5th grade, students should know that the greater the force is, the greater the change in motion will be. The more massive an object is, the less effect a given force will have.
  • 4F/M3a. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that an unbalanced force acting on an object changes its speed or direction of motion, or both.

9. The Mathematical World

9B. Symbolic Relationships
  • 9B/M3*. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that graphs can show a variety of possible relationships between two variables. As one variable increases uniformly, the other may do one of the following: increase or decrease steadily, increase or decrease faster and faster, get closer and closer to some limiting value, reach some intermediate maximum or minimum, alternately increase and decrease, increase or decrease in steps, or do something different from any of these.
9C. Shapes
  • 9C/M4*. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that the graphic display of numbers may help to show patterns such as trends, varying rates of change, gaps, or clusters that are useful when making predictions about the phenomena being graphed.

Copyright
© Copyright The Concord Consortium

Record Link
<a href="">The Concord Consortium. Making Waves. Concord: The Concord Consortium, 2010, September 23.</a>

AIP
Making Waves (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2010, September 23), WWW Document, (https://concord.org/).

AJP
Making Waves (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2010, September 23), WWW Document, (https://concord.org/).

APA
Making Waves. (2010, September 23). Retrieved 2017, January 20, from The Concord Consortium: https://concord.org/

Disclaimer: The Concord Consortium offers citation styles as a guide only. We cannot offer interpretations about citations as this is an automated procedure.

Requirements

This activity runs entirely in a Web browser. Preferred browsers are: Google Chrome (versions 30 and above), Safari (versions 7 and above), Firefox (version 30 and above), Internet Explorer (version 10 or higher), and Microsoft's Edge.

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Innovative Technology in Science InquiryThis resource is a part of the Concord Consortium's Innovative Technology in Science Inquiry project.

Grade Level
Middle School
Subject
Physics
Focus Area
Modeling and Simulation
Rating
0
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