Launching a Satellite

Study how to fire something into space.

Launch Activity

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Requirements

Isaac Newton’s famous thought experiment about what would happen if you launched a cannon from a mountaintop at a high velocity comes to life with an interactive computer model. You are charged with the task of launching a satellite into space. Control the angle and speed at which the satellite is launched, and see the results to gain a basic understanding of escape velocity.

Launch Activity

WARNING: Your data will not be saved. To save data, run this activity as a registered user. You can register at the project portal. Please view the requirements below before launching this activity.

AAAS Benchmark Alignments (2008)

4. The Physical Setting

4B. The Earth
  • 4B/M3. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that everything on or anywhere near the earth is pulled toward the earth's center by gravitational force.
4G. Forces of Nature
  • 4G/M2. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that the sun's gravitational pull holds the earth and other planets in their orbits, just as the planets' gravitational pull keeps their moons in orbit around them.
  • 4G/H1. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that gravitational force is an attraction between masses. The strength of the force is proportional to the masses and weakens rapidly with increasing distance between them.

9. The Mathematical World

9B. Symbolic Relationships
  • 9B/H4. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that tables, graphs, and symbols are alternative ways of representing data and relationships that can be translated from one to another.

11. Common Themes

11B. Models
  • 11B/M1*. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that models are often used to think about processes that happen too slowly, too quickly, or on too small a scale to observe directly. They are also used for processes that are too vast, too complex, or too dangerous to study.
  • 11B/M5**. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that the usefulness of a model depends on how closely its behavior matches key aspects of what is being modeled. The only way to determine the usefulness of a model is to compare its behavior to the behavior of the real-world object, event, or process being modeled.

Copyright
© Copyright The Concord Consortium

Record Link
<a href="">The Concord Consortium. Launching a Satellite. Concord: The Concord Consortium, 2010, September 23.</a>

AIP
Launching a Satellite (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2010, September 23), WWW Document, (https://concord.org/).

AJP
Launching a Satellite (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2010, September 23), WWW Document, (https://concord.org/).

APA
Launching a Satellite. (2010, September 23). Retrieved 2017, June 27, from The Concord Consortium: https://concord.org/

Disclaimer: The Concord Consortium offers citation styles as a guide only. We cannot offer interpretations about citations as this is an automated procedure.

Requirements

This activity runs entirely in a Web browser. Preferred browsers are: Google Chrome (versions 30 and above), Safari (versions 7 and above), Firefox (version 30 and above), Internet Explorer (version 10 or higher), and Microsoft's Edge.

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Innovative Technology in Science InquiryThis resource is a part of the Concord Consortium's Innovative Technology in Science Inquiry project.

Grade Level
Middle School
Subject
Earth and Space Science
Focus Area
Modeling and Simulation
Rating
0
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