How Electrons Move

Discover the forces affecting the movement of electrons, including electric and magnetic fields.

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Requirements

On OS X 10.9 or newer, you will need to install a launcher application to run this Java activity. If you have not already installed it, please:

  • Download the launcher installer
  • Open the downloaded .dmg file and drag the CCLauncher application to your Applications folder
  • Return to this page and launch the resource

Being able to control the movement of electrons is fundamental for making all electronic devices work. Discover how electric and magnetic fields can be used to move electrons around. Begin by exploring the relationship between electric forces and charges with vectors. Then, learn about electron fields. Finally, test your knowledge in a fun "Electron Shooting" game!

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WARNING: Your data will not be saved. To save data, run this activity as a registered user. You can register at the project portal. Please view the requirements below before launching this activity.

AAAS Benchmark Alignments (2008)

4. The Physical Setting

4F. Motion
  • 4F/H3a*. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that when electrically charged objects undergo a change in motion, they produce electromagnetic waves around them.
4G. Forces of Nature
  • 4G/H2a*. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that electric forces acting within and between atoms are vastly stronger than the gravitational forces acting between the atoms. At larger scales, gravitational forces accumulate to produce a large and noticeable effect, whereas electric forces tend to cancel each other out.
  • 4G/H5ab*. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that magnetic forces are very closely related to electric forces and are thought of as different aspects of a single electromagnetic force. Moving electrically charged objects produces magnetic forces and moving magnets produces electric forces.
  • 4G/H5c*. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that the interplay of electric and magnetic forces is the basis for many modern technologies, including electric motors, generators, and devices that produce or receive electromagnetic waves.
  • 4G/H7** (SFAA). By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that electric currents in the earth's interior give the earth an extensive magnetic field, which we detect from the orientation of compass needles.

11. Common Themes

11B. Models
  • 11B/M1*. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that models are often used to think about processes that happen too slowly, too quickly, or on too small a scale to observe directly. They are also used for processes that are too vast, too complex, or too dangerous to study.
  • 11B/H1a*. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that a mathematical model uses rules and relationships to describe and predict objects and events in the real world.

Copyright
© Copyright The Concord Consortium

Record Link
<a href="">The Concord Consortium. How Electrons Move. Concord: The Concord Consortium, 2011, September 19.</a>

AIP
How Electrons Move (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2011, September 19), WWW Document, (https://concord.org/).

AJP
How Electrons Move (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2011, September 19), WWW Document, (https://concord.org/).

APA
How Electrons Move. (2011, September 19). Retrieved 2017, June 29, from The Concord Consortium: https://concord.org/

Disclaimer: The Concord Consortium offers citation styles as a guide only. We cannot offer interpretations about citations as this is an automated procedure.

Requirements

This activity requires the Java Runtime Environment version 5 (sometimes referred to as 1.5) or later with Java Webstart. You can download it at java.com.

On OS X 10.9 or newer, you will need to install a launcher application to run this Java activity. If you have not already installed it, please:

  • Download the launcher installer
  • Open the downloaded .dmg file and drag the CCLauncher application to your Applications folder
  • Return to this page and launch the resource

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Electron TechnologiesThis resource is a part of the Concord Consortium's Electron Technologies project.

Grade Level
High School, Higher Education
Subject
Physics
Focus Area
Modeling and Simulation
Rating
0
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