Catalysts

Explore the effects of homogeneous catalysts.

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There are two types of catalysis reactions: homogeneous and heterogeneous. In a homogeneous reaction, the catalyst is in the same phase as the reactants. In a heterogeneous reaction, the catalyst is in a different phase from the reactants. This activity addresses homogeneous catalysis.

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Download Size: 70 KB

WARNING: Your data will not be saved. To save data, run this activity as a registered user. You can register at the project portal. Please view the requirements below before launching this activity.

AAAS Benchmark Alignments (2008)

4. The Physical Setting

4D. The Structure of Matter
  • 4D/M11** (NSES). By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that substances react chemically in characteristic ways with other substances to form new substances with different characteristic properties.
  • 4D/M13**. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that the idea of atoms explains chemical reactions: When substances interact to form new substances, the atoms that make up the molecules of the original substances combine in new ways.
  • 4D/H7a. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that atoms often join with one another in various combinations in distinct molecules or in repeating three-dimensional crystal patterns.
  • 4D/H9a. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that the rate of reactions among atoms and molecules depends on how often they encounter one another, which is affected by the concentration, pressure, and temperature of the reacting materials.

11. Common Themes

11B. Models
  • 11B/H1a*. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that a mathematical model uses rules and relationships to describe and predict objects and events in the real world.
  • 11B/H2*. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that computers have greatly improved the power and use of mathematical models by performing computations that are very long, very complicated, or repetitive. Therefore, computers can reveal the consequences of applying complex rules or of changing the rules. The graphic capabilities of computers make them useful in the design and simulated testing of devices and structures and in the simulation of complicated processes.

Copyright
© Copyright The Concord Consortium

Record Link
<a href="">The Concord Consortium. Catalysts. Concord: The Concord Consortium, 2010, September 23.</a>

AIP
Catalysts (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2010, September 23), WWW Document, (https://concord.org/).

AJP
Catalysts (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2010, September 23), WWW Document, (https://concord.org/).

APA
Catalysts. (2010, September 23). Retrieved 2017, June 29, from The Concord Consortium: https://concord.org/

Disclaimer: The Concord Consortium offers citation styles as a guide only. We cannot offer interpretations about citations as this is an automated procedure.

Requirements

This activity requires the Java Runtime Environment version 5 (sometimes referred to as 1.5) or later with Java Webstart. You can download it at java.com.

The download for this activity will require 70 KB of disk space.

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Science of Atoms and MoleculesThis resource is a part of the Concord Consortium's Science of Atoms and Molecules project.

Grade Level
High School, Higher Education
Subject
Chemistry
Focus Area
Modeling and Simulation
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