Baggie Chemistry

Household chemicals mixed in a baggie produce dramatic results.

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Requirements

In this experiment, two chemicals that can be found around the house will be mixed within a plastic baggie, and several chemical changes will be observed.

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Subject
Chemistry

Focus Area
Probeware

Grade Level
Middle School, High School

License
CC BY 4.0

AAAS Benchmark Alignments (2008)

4. The Physical Setting

4D. The Structure of Matter
  • 4D/M3ab. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that atoms and molecules are perpetually in motion. Increased temperature means greater average energy of motion, so most substances expand when heated.
  • 4D/M4. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that the temperature and acidity of a solution influence reaction rates. Many substances dissolve in water, which may greatly facilitate reactions between them.
  • 4D/M11** (NSES). By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that substances react chemically in characteristic ways with other substances to form new substances with different characteristic properties.
  • 4D/M13**. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that the idea of atoms explains chemical reactions: When substances interact to form new substances, the atoms that make up the molecules of the original substances combine in new ways.
  • 4D/H9a. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that the rate of reactions among atoms and molecules depends on how often they encounter one another, which is affected by the concentration, pressure, and temperature of the reacting materials.
  • 4D/H9b. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that some atoms and molecules are highly effective in encouraging the interaction of others.

9. The Mathematical World

9B. Symbolic Relationships
  • 9B/M2*. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that rates of change can be computed from differences in magnitudes and vice versa.
  • 9B/M3*. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that graphs can show a variety of possible relationships between two variables. As one variable increases uniformly, the other may do one of the following: increase or decrease steadily, increase or decrease faster and faster, get closer and closer to some limiting value, reach some intermediate maximum or minimum, alternately increase and decrease, increase or decrease in steps, or do something different from any of these.

11. Common Themes

11A. Systems
  • 11A/M1. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that a system can include processes as well as things.
11C. Constancy and Change
  • 11C/M4. By the end of the 8th grade, students should know that symbolic equations can be used to summarize how the quantity of something changes over time or in response to other changes.
  • 11C/H1*. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that if a system in equilibrium is disturbed, it may return to a very similar state of equilibrium, or it may undergo a radical change until the system achieves a new state of equilibrium with very different conditions, or it may fail to achieve any type of equilibrium.
  • 11C/H4. By the end of the 12th grade, students should know that graphs and equations are useful (and often equivalent) ways for depicting and analyzing patterns of change.

Copyright
© Copyright The Concord Consortium

Record Link
<a href="">The Concord Consortium. Baggie Chemistry. Concord: The Concord Consortium, 2011, May 26.</a>

AIP
Baggie Chemistry (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2011, May 26), WWW Document, (https://concord.org/).

AJP
Baggie Chemistry (The Concord Consortium, Concord, 2011, May 26), WWW Document, (https://concord.org/).

APA
Baggie Chemistry. (2011, May 26). Retrieved 2017, January 16, from The Concord Consortium: https://concord.org/

Disclaimer: The Concord Consortium offers citation styles as a guide only. We cannot offer interpretations about citations as this is an automated procedure.

Requirements

This activity runs entirely in a Web browser. Preferred browsers are: Google Chrome (versions 30 and above), Safari (versions 7 and above), Firefox (version 30 and above), Internet Explorer (version 10 or higher), and Microsoft's Edge.

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Innovative Technology in Science InquiryThis resource is a part of the Concord Consortium's Innovative Technology in Science Inquiry project.

Grade Level
Middle School, High School
Subject
Chemistry
Focus Area
Probeware
Rating
0
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